When a person in Kansas City is charged with a drug crime under federal law, these charges may vary based on the type of drug at issue. Not all drugs are treated the same when it comes to federal law. Under federal law drugs are classified into five different “schedules” based on the drug’s propensity for abuse or how great the propensity for addiction is. The following is a brief overview of these schedules.

Schedule I drugs

Schedule I drugs are those that do not have an acceptable medical use and have a high propensity for abuse. Some examples of Schedule I drugs include heroin, LSD and ecstasy. It is important to note that under federal law marijuana is also a Schedule I drug even if it has been decriminalized or made legal under state law.

Schedule II drugs

Schedule II drugs are those that have a high propensity for abuse and can be severely psychologically or physically addictive. Vicodin, cocaine, meth, OxyContin and fentanyl are all examples of Schedule II drugs.

Schedule III drugs

Schedule III drugs are those that have a moderate to low propensity for being physically or psychologically addictive. In addition, the potential for abuse of a Schedule III drug is less than Schedule I and Schedule II drugs but greater than Schedule IV drugs. Tylenol with codeine, steroids and ketamine are all examples of Schedule III drugs.

Schedule IV drugs

Schedule IV drugs are those that have a low propensity for abuse and a low propensity for becoming addictive. Xanax, Valium and Tramadol are all examples of Schedule IV drugs.

Schedule V drugs

Schedule V drugs are those that have less of a propensity for abuse than Schedule IV drugs and have certain amounts of narcotics in them. Robitussin AC, Lyrica and Parepectolin are all examples of Schedule V drugs.

Learn more about drug crimes

In general Schedule I drug crimes have more serious consequences than Schedule II drugs, etc. This post is for educational purposes only and does not contain legal advice. Our firm’s webpage on drug offenses may be of interest to those in Missouri who are facing drug charges and want to learn more about their rights and options.