There can be both criminal and administrative consequences to a DUI charge. Both can be difficult to handle. One of the administrative consequences associated with drunk driving charges is the potential loss of a driver’s license, which can create significant difficulties in the accused driver’s life.

What happens to my driver’s license after a DUI?

Following a DUI, whether the accused driver’s license is suspended or revoked, and for how long, depends on their prior driving record over the previous 5 years. If the accused driver has been convicted of an alcohol- or drug-related traffic offense or had their license suspended during the previous 5 years for an alcohol- or drug-related traffic offense, authorities will revoke the license for 1 year.

If the accused driver does not have a prior conviction or suspension in the previous 5 years, the driver will receive a 90-day suspension. The suspension or revocation is effective 15 days following the arrest or 15 days after the hearing decision is mailed.

The accused driver can challenge the suspension or revocation at the administrative hearing or petition the circuit court. If the suspension or revocation is upheld by the circuit court, the driver can meet the reinstatement requirements to get their full driving privileges back.

It should give accused drivers some peace of mind knowing that they may be able to get their license reinstated after a drunk driving arrest. However, because there are criminal and administrative components to a DUI arrest, accused drivers should be familiar with their criminal defense options and protections.